Fall 2016

Edited by Barry Kitterman | Andrea Spofford | Amy Wright



Poetry

​from Leafmold, Disguised as an Exercise

​F. Daniel Rzicznek


Disguised as an exercise, he taught the non-relation of one thing to another. An avalanche of soup pots on the first night that sounds like winter. Now it is direct relation of one to other: context of sound deepening his judgment of color. He closes up in August and mentally constructs a foot of snow on the house—the mailman opens his mouth and the mail rushes out. Now that he’s singing it’s all relation and non, blended to a fine, quite clean confusion. His world has invented a music to be recycled forever, forever—he’ll never wake and think of the weather, only music. He’ll never think to take up sailing, only the music. How did I get from the metropark to the flooded corn? He’ll ask. From there, it’s the drug-scorched neighbor panicking down the cellar stairs, tornado sirens in pursuit, fog to guide the river’s dead, a child punishing his toys as a joke, rain that shuts down at dawn: the view becomes perfect enough to believe. Enter a woman. He prays it will be her for all the years and not brain-gray strangers in her clothes, not the thousand year blizzard of summer.

 

 

_______________________

F. Daniel Rzicznek is the author of two poetry collections, Divination Machine (Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press, 2009) and Neck of the World (Utah State University Press, 2007), as well as four chapbooks, most recently Live Feeds (Epiphany Editions, 2015). His recent poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Volt, Kenyon Review, Massachusetts ReviewThe Pinch, Drunken Boat, and elsewhere. Also coeditor of The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Prose Poetry: Contemporary Poets in Discussion and Practice (Rose Metal Press, 2010), Rzicznek teaches writing at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. 




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