Additional Selections from This Issue

Whittling My Legs into a Rocking Chair by Alex Lemon

If some higher power knows
What’s best for us, then bring

On a monsoon of dung
Beetles, a mouthful of rats.

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An Interview with Diane Kraynak

Amy Wright for Zone 3: Are you religious? I ask because I wonder what kind of resonance the name Lazarus has or had for you. Diane Kraynak: The short answer to your question is no, I’m not religious.

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Lazy Eye by Jenny L. Rife

There were warnings for days and by now, Brandy recognized them. Cigarette butts spilled over the brim of her mother’s turquoise ashtray, and more were stubbed out on the dishes piled in the si

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Hill Bowling by Scott Eubanks

Sunny Vale Avenue was the steepest residential street in Simi Valley, so steep that it had thick speed bumps with diagonal yellow stripes painted across them. The road itself slalomed down the hillsid

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Lazarus by Diane Kraynak

The little brown baby lay on his back. Opal, a bedside nurse, stood behind his incubator. Its plastic blurred the Snoopy pattern on her scrubs. Blue lights lit the incubator’s Plexiglas roof and made

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Eat Me: Instructions from the Unseen by Sarah A. Odishoo

I don’t know what to think of “angels.” They are more sea spray than tide, more earthquake than stone buildings, and every now and then, a crocus or those magnolia buds that burst open ove

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Dukkha by Philip Matthews

Is the heart that does not fit / into its groove. / Please press one. Please wait / for an operator to assist you. /

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As If We Were, As If We Were by H.L. Hix

I create lozenges compacted from listenings-in. / I illuminate familiar dreams and fables, / fit their formal structures to unique objects. / I badger abstractions into relevance,

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[A glass house holds no interior design] by Brent Goodman

A glass house holds no interior design. / Ask the autumn-lit trees how to say thank you. / Stop the wind at your door but welcome the sky.

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