Upcoming Events

Bread and Words

Bread & Words: 23rd Annual Benefit Reading

November 20, 2017 / Dinner at 6:00 & Readings at 7:00pm, MUC Ballroom AB

A meal of homemade soups and bread, prepared by faculty members in the Department of Languages & Literature, will be served at 6:00, followed by a reading at 7:00. This year’s readers are Hannah Boyd, Tim Donahoo, Caleb Ervin, Arizona Hurn, Barry Kitterman & Allison Parker. Music by Chuck Emery. A $5 donation for the APSU Food Pantry is requested at the door.


Jennifer Callahan

Alumni Reading and Film Screening

October 26, 2017 / 4:00pm

On October 26, 2017 at 4 pm in the APSU Art & Design Building, Room 120, Stephanie Dugger, an alumna of Austin Peay, will read from her new book, Either Way, You're Done (Sundress Publications, 2017). Her chapbook, Sterling (Paper Nautilus, 2015), won the Vella Chapbook contest. She teaches at Austin Peay State University and is Assistant Poetry Editor for Zone 3 literary journal.

Jennifer Callahan, writer-director of the short film Beulah Land (2015), earned her BFA from Austin Peay and her MFA in Photography from Washington University in St. Louis. Owner of Jennifer Callahan Photography, she now lives and works in Asheville, North Carolina. Learn more about her work at www. jennifercallahanphotography.com.


Cait Weiss Orcutt and Douglas Kearney

Poetry Reading with Cait Weiss Orcutt and Douglas Kearney

October 5, 2017 / 8:00 pm, Art & Design Building, Room 120

Los Angeles native CAIT WEISS ORCUTT has been published in FIELD, Tupelo Quarterly, Slipstream, The Pinch, and other journals. Her honors include the Helen Earnhart Harley Fellowship and OSU’s Academy of American Poets Award. Cait won the 2016 Zone 3 Press First Book Award or her poetry collection, VALLEYSPEAK

Advance praise for VALLEYSPEAK:

"Valleyspeak is both exorcism and re-enchantment. It's also a collection of memorizing coming-of-age visions that emerge from the world of L.A. daughters, 'Sweet Valley/Ophelias, who haven’t quite/drowned.'  In this world of cars, swimming pools, porn, pills, and beautiful parents distracted by their own desires, Cait Orcutt unravels secrets of addiction and abandonment that are personal, familial, and cultural.  A re-angler of the 'mind’s film,' she unravels and detoxifies the Valley’s intoxicating spells as she magically re-makes them."
—Mary Syzbist

                                                         *****

Poet, performer, and librettist DOUGLAS KEARNEY received his BA from Howard University and his MFA from the California Institute of the Arts. He has published six books, most recently, Buck Studies, described by the New York Times as "a potent cocktail of political anger and radical formal experimentation." In the Los Angeles Times, poet David St. John observed, “What Doug’s articulating is the fragmentation of the self and sensibility that you see prominently in T.S. Eliot and The Waste Land. He’s at the other end of the century, using a multicultural voice inflected with the concerns of what it means to be a young black man at this time and at this place." His other books include The Black Automaton (2009), a National Poetry Series selection; Patter (2014), a finalist for the California Book Award; and Someone Took They Tongues (2016), a collection of opera libretti. Learn more about Kearney at www.douglaskearney.com. 

 


Steven Sherrill

A Reading by Steven Sherrill

September 19, 2017 / 4:00pm, Art & Design Building Room 120

STEVEN SHERRILL has been making trouble with words since 8th grade, when he was suspended from school for two weeks for a story he wrote. He dropped out of school in the 10th grade, eventually earned a Welding Diploma from Mitchell Community College, and then an MFA in Poetry from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Now, he is an associate professor of English and Integrative Arts at Penn State University, Altoona, where he teaches, paints, and captains the Allegheny Bilge Rats Shanty Choir. He has published five novels and a book of poems. He is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship for Fiction in 2002. His first novel, The Minotaur Takes a Cigarette Break (2000), is translated into 8 languages and was recently released as an audio book by Neil Gaiman Productions. His other works include Visits from the Drowned Girl (nominated for the Pulitzer Prize) (2004), The Locktender’s House (2007), Ersatz Anatomy (2010), JOY, PA (2015), and most recently, The Minotaur Takes His Own Sweet Time (2016). Taken from stevensherrill.com.


Dorothy Allison

An Evening with Dorothy Allison

April 7, 2017 / 8:00pm, George & Sharon Mabry Concert Hall


DOROTHY ALLISON, recipient of the 2016-17 Acuff Chair of Excellence, will give a reading from her work on April 7, 2017 at 8 pm in the APSU Mabry Concert Hall.

Allison is the author of the poetry collection The Women Who Hate Me: Poems 1980–1990 (1991). Her story collection Trash (1988) won two Lambda Literary Awards and the American Library Association’s Prize for Lesbian and Gay Writing. Her best-selling novel Bastard Out of Carolina (1992) was a finalist for the National Book Award and has been translated into more than a dozen languages, as well as made into a feature film. Her novel Cavedweller (1998) was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She is also the author of the essay collection Skin: Talking about Sex, Class & Literature (1994) and the memoir Two or Three Things I Know for Sure (1995). Her work is featured in many anthologies, including The Writer’s Notebook: Craft Essays from Tin House (2009). She is the subject of Conversations with Dorothy Allison (2012), by Mae Miller Claxton, and the short documentary film Two or Three Things but Nothing for Sure (1998), by filmmakers Tina DiFeliciantonio and Jane Wagner. Her additional honors include the Robert Penn Warren Award for Fiction. (bio from PoetryFoundation.org)


Erik Anderson and Amy Fusselman

A Reading with Erik Anderson & Amy Fusselman

March 23, 2017 / 8:00pm, APSU Morgan University Center Ballroom

ERIK ANDERSON is the author of Flutter Point (Zone 3 Press, 2017), The Poetics of Trespass (Otis Books/Seismicity Editions, 2010), and Estranger (Rescue Press, 2016). He teaches creative writing at Franklin and Marshall College, where he directs the annual Emerging Writers Festival. 

AMY FUSSELMAN is a writer, editor, and publisher based in New York City. She is the author of three books of nonfiction: Savage Park: A Meditation on Play, Space and Risk for Americans Who Are Nervous, Distracted and Afraid to Die (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015); The Pharmacist's Mate (McSweeney’s, 2013); and 8 (McSweeney’s, 2013).
      Her writing has appeared in ARTnewsMs., the New York TimesArtnet, and The Atlantic, among other places. Her parenting column, “Family Practice,” appears on McSweeney’s Internet Tendency.


Bread and Words

Bread & Words: 22nd Annual Benefit Reading

November 21, 2016 / 6:00pm, Reading at 7:00pm

A meal of homemade soups and bread, prepared by faculty members in the Department of Languages & Literature, will be served at 6:00, followed by a reading at 7:00. This year’s readers are Ben Caldwell and James Tyler, graduate students in the department of Languages & Literature; Stephanie Bryant, Rachel Chaffin, and Deidra Sloss, undergraduate students in the creative writing program; and Andrea Spofford, associate professor of English. A $5 donation for the APSU Food Pantry is requested at the door.


Dustin Parsons, Garyt McDowell & Caitlin McGuire

Zone 3 30th Anniversary Reading

November 4, 2016 / 4:00pm

Dustin Parsons has an MA from Kansas State University and an MFA from Bowling Green State University. Awards for his writing include an Ohio Arts Grant and a New York Fine Arts grant in creative non-fiction, the 2013 American Literary Review Prize in fiction, the 2014 fiction prize from The Laurel Review and a “notable” in the 2014 Best American Essays. He was awarded a residency fellowship at Wyoming’s Brush Creek Foundation of the Arts. He is associate professor of English at State University of New York-Fredonia. He lives in western New York with his wife, the poet Aimee Nezhukumatathil, and their two wily toddlers.

Gary McDowell is the author of five collections of poetry, including, most recently, Mysteries in a World that Thinks There Are None (Burnside Review Press, 2016), winner of the 2014 Burnside Review Press Book Award, and Weeping at a Stranger’s Funeral (Dream Horse Press, 2014). He’s also the co-editor of The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Prose Poetry (Rose Metal Press, 2010). His poems and essays have appeared in journals such as American Poetry Review, The Nation, and Gulf Coast. He lives in Nashville, TN with his family where he’s an assistant professor of English at Belmont University.

Caitlin McGuire was born in San Diego and grew up in California, but calls Seattle home. She has completed residencies in Croatia, Serbia, and Brooklyn, and her work has appeared or is forthcoming in River Teeth, Harpur Palate, Redivider, and Ninth Letter, among others.


Dorothy Allison

A Reading by 2016–17 Acuff Chair of Excellence Dorothy Allison

October 27, 2016 / 8:00pm

Allison is the author of the poetry collection The Women Who Hate Me: Poems 1980–1990 (1991). Her story collection Trash (1988) won two Lambda Literary Awards and the American Library Association’s Prize for Lesbian and Gay Writing. Her best-selling novel Bastard Out of Carolina (1992) was a finalist for the National Book Award and has been translated into more than a dozen languages, as well as made into a feature film. Her novel Cavedweller (1998) was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She is also the author of the essay collection Skin: Talking about Sex, Class & Literature (1994) and the memoir Two or Three Things I Know for Sure (1995). Her work is featured in many anthologies, including The Writer’s Notebook: Craft Essays from Tin House (2009). She is the subject of Conversations with Dorothy Allison (2012), by Mae Miller Claxton, and the short documentary film Two or Three Things but Nothing for Sure (1998), by filmmakers Tina DiFeliciantonio and Jane Wagner. Her additional honors include the Robert Penn Warren Award for Fiction. (bio from PoetryFoundation.org)


Spofford, Wright, and Kitterman

Zone 3 Editors Reading

October 6, 2016 / 8:00pm

Andrea Spofford writes poems and essays, some of which can be found or are forthcoming in The Account, Cimarron Review, inter|rupture, New South, The Portland Review, Sugar House Review, Puerto del Sol, and more. She is the author of three chapbooks and one full-length collection of poetry, The Pine Effect.

Amy Wright is the author of Everything in the Universe, Cracker Sonnets, and five chapbooks. Together with William Wright, she co-authored Creeks of the Upper South. She is also Nonfiction Editor of Zone 3 Press, and Coordinator of Creative Writing at Austin Peay State University.

Barry Kitterman (UC Berkeley, Univ. of Montana) is the author of a novel, The Baker’s Boy, and a collection of stories, From The San Joaquin. His work has been recognized through grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Tennessee Arts Council, and the Hambidge Center for the Arts.


Aimee Nezhukumatathil

A Reading by Aimee Nezhukumatathil

September 15, 2016 / 8:00pm

Nezhukumatathil is the author of three poetry collections: Lucky Fish (2011), winner of the gold medal in poetry from the Independent Publisher Book Awards and the Eric Hoffer Grand Prize for Independent Books; At the Drive-in Volcano (2007), winner of the Balcones Prize; and Miracle Fruit (2003), winner of Tupelo Press Prize, ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year Award, the Global Filipino Award and finalist for the Glasgow Prize and the Asian American Literary Award. Her most recent chapbook is Lace & Pyrite, a collaboration of nature poems with the poet Ross Gay.


Raven Jackson, Chip Boles, and Anthony Sims, Jr. will read at APSU

Alumni Reading with Raven Jackson, Chip Boles, and Anthony Sims, Jr.

February 16, 2016 / 4:00pm

A native of Tennessee, Raven Jackson is a poet and filmmaker currently attending New York University’s Graduate Film Program. A Cave Canem fellow and a graduate of the New School’s Writing Program, her work has appeared or is forthcoming in TriQuarterly, CALYX, Kweli, Phantom Limb, PANK, and elsewhere. She is on production on her fourth short film.

Originally from Nashville, TN, Chip Boles has worked in a combination of traditional and digital media since 2001. Known for realistic illustrations of unreal things, his work tends toward the realistic-but-caricatured; the beautiful-but-monstrous. Boles holds an MFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design (2007) and a BFA from Austin Peay State University (2000). His illustration clients include The Wall Street Journal Asia and CNN. He illustrated and designed the Yokai Character Collection, which was featured in the New York Times Arts (May 20, 2015). Boles is also a mural and scenic painter, having worked for the series Nashville, as well as Nashville Children’s Theater.

 

After finishing his English degree at APSU in 1999, Anthony Sims went on to an MFA in Film from Ohio University. His feature screenplay, Behemoth, was optioned by Lucy Darwin (Match Point, Lost in LaMancha) in 2006. His short film, “The Day After Stonewall Died” (dir. John Dower) won Best Short Film at the Cannes Short Film Festival. Anthony lives in Atlanta, splitting time between freelance content creation and learning to build web applications.


Kelly Beard

KELLY BEARD WINS 2017 CREATIVE NONFICTION BOOK AWARD

October 27, 2017 /

We are happy to announce that judge Janisse Ray has selected Kelly Beard's memoir, AN IMPERFECT RAPTURE, as the 2017 winner of the Zone 3 Press Creative Nonfiction Book Award! Kelly will receive $1,000, and her book will be published in the fall of 2018. Congratulations to Kelly!

Kelly Beard received her MFA in Creative Writing from the Vermont College of Fine Arts in July of 2016. Her work has appeared in recent issues of Five Points, the Santa Ana River Review, and Bacopa Literary Review.
                                                                 ***

We would also like to congratulate runner-up Doug Crandell and this year's finalists and semifinalists. 

Runner-up: Tornado Season by Doug Crandell

Finalists:
Justin Gardiner, Beneath the Shadow: Legacy and Longing in the Anarctic
Peter Grandbois, Kissing the Lobster 
Rachel Michelle Hanson, The End of Tennessee 
Anne Panning, Walking Backwards 
Julie Marie Wade, Telephone: Essays in Two Voices 
A.A. Weiss, Lenin's Asylum 

Semifinalists:
Kim Adrian, The 27th Letter of the Alphabet
Kat Moore, In a Blue Fog
Lucy Sweeney Byrne, Selfie
Laurie Blauner, I Was One of My Memories
Julie Marie Wade, The Hourglass: Meditations on the Body
Sandra Worsham, Going to Wings
Jodie Noel Vinson, The Only House in the World
Janet Yoder, Where the Language Lives
Charles Green, Ways of Being Afraid
M.B. McLatchey, Beginner’s Mind
Jacqueline Haskins, Underwater, Eyes Open
Betty Jo Buro, The Road from Emmaus
Alison Amorello Seibold, Somebody’s Babies

Sincerest thanks to our readers, to final judge Janisse Ray, and to all who submitted manuscripts to this year's contest. 


Quick, Lauren, and Restrepo

2017 Zone 3 Contest Award Winners

October 16, 2017 /

Zone 3 is pleased to announce the winners of our annual nonfiction, fiction, and poetry contests: Dan Beachy-Quick, for his essay “, Even" (Spring 2017); A.D. Lauren, for her poem “Hermeneutics of a 21-year-old's Death” (Fall 2017); and Yuly Restrepo, for her story “Morocho” (Spring 2017).

Dan Beachy-Quick directs the MFA program at Colorado State University. He is the author of three books of prose, most recently Of Silence and Song (Milkweed Editions, 2017). He is also the author of six poetry collections, including Circle's Apprentice, winner of the Colorado Book Award. His honors and awards include a Lannan Foundation Residency and a Guggenheim Fellowship. 

A.D. Lauren is currently pursuing an MFA in poetry at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Her work has appeared in the Apeiron Review, Spires, Zeniada, and elsewhere. She was a 2017 fellow of the Bucknell Seminar for Undergraduate Poets.

Yuly Restrepo was born in Medellín. In 2001, at the height of Colombia’s civil war, she and her family moved to the United States, where they were granted political asylum. Yuly is now a naturalized citizen of the United States. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and a writing professor at the University of Tampa. Currently, the primary subject of her fiction is the country of her birth.

Congratulations to this year's winners!


Caitlin Weiss

Caitlin Weiss Orcutt Wins 2016 First Book Award for Poetry

December 12, 2016 /

We are happy to announce that judge Douglas Kearney has selected Cait Weiss Orcutt's collection VALLEYSPEAK as the 2016 winner of the Zone 3 Press First Book Award. Cait will receive $1,000, and her book will be published in the fall of 2017. Congratulations, Cait! 

Los Angeles native Caitlin Weiss Orcutt has been published in FIELD, Tupelo Quarterly, Slipstream, The Pinch, and other journals. Her honors include the Helen Earnhart Harley Fellowship and OSU's Academy of American Poets Award.


Z3 Online, Exclusive digital material

Announcing Z3 Online

November 19, 2016 /

Our web component, Z3 Online, is designed to enhance the print editions of our journal. Look for interviews, reviews, web exclusives, digital books, and editors' picks. Check us out and spread the word! 


Flutter Point Blog Image

Announcing our forthcoming nonfiction book, Flutter Point by Erik Anderson (pub. date March 1, 2017)

November 13, 2016 /

Flutter PointZone 3 Press is pleased to announce that Erik Anderson’s forthcoming collection of essays, Flutter Point, is now available for preorder. Erik’s manuscript was selected by Amy Fusselman as the 2015 winner of our nonfiction book contest. He received a $1,000 prize, and his book will be published in the spring of 2017.

Erik Anderson is the author of The Poetics of Trepass (Otis Books/Seismicity Editions, 2010) and Estranger (Rescue Press, 2016). He teaches Creative Writing at Franklin and Marshall College, where he directs the annual Emerging Writers Festival.

 

ADVANCE PRAISE FOR FLUTTER POINT

“Flutter Point’s essays are palpably haunted by the past and future of our species and planet. But Anderson does something rare and even hopeful, even so: his ruminations pry apart our default intuitions about humanness and animality, the natural and built environments, art, language, and the body, and hold them apart like parentheses for us, to find a little space inside. In that space, these essays search for truthful, appropriate kinds of mourning and pleasure, presence and detachment. The brilliance of Flutter Point is that what results are fresh new forms of the essay—moving, intelligent, relentless, still, and made exactly for our time”

—Kristin Dombek, author of The Selfishness of Others: An Essay on the Fear of Narcissism

 

“Erik Anderson, in these very edgy essays of Flutter Point, mines the rich ore of the “or,” back slashing, back and forth, through the porous membranes of punctuated category, the skeletal strata of this gelatinous and layered world. To “decide” is to cut, to sever, and Anderson is a katana smith par excellence, folding fluid steel, folding it back on itself again and again, peening home the sudden stunning serration less, it seems, than a molecule thick, while still separating out those old infinite spaces between the stars and the anxious quantum angstroms buzzing at the center of our very beings.”

—Michael Martone, author of Four for a Quarter and Michael Martone

 


David Huddle, James Braziel, and Erinn Batykefer

2016 Zone 3 Contest Award Winners

November 12, 2016 /

ZONE 3 is pleased to announce the winners of our annual nonfiction, fiction, and poetry contests: David Huddle, for his essay “Verbal Binary Presence in Early Childhood Development, that Infamously Difficult Poetic Form the Villanelle, and the Spiritual Quotidian” (Fall 2016); James Braziel, for his story “Shiner” (Spring 2016); and Erinn Batykefer, for her poem “Two Bees” (Spring 2016).

David HuddleDavid Huddle is the author of twenty novels, short story collections, essays, and volumes of poetry, including Blacksnake at the Family Reunion (2013 PEN New England Award in poetry) and My Immaculate Assassin. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The American Scholar, Esquire, Harper's, Shenandoah, and The Georgia Review. He teaches at the Bread Loaf School of English and the Rainier Writing Workshop.

James Braziel is the author of the novels Birmingham, 35 Miles and Snakeskin Road, which follow the consequences of an ecological disaster in the South. His essays and works of fiction have appeared in the New York Times, Appalachian Heritage, Southern Humanities Review, and other journals.  He lives in north Alabama with his wife, poet Tina Mozelle Braziel. They are in the process of building a cabin by hand and writing about their experience. 

Erinn Batykefer is a writer and a librarian. She earned her MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is the author of Allegheny, Monongahela (Red Hen Press) and The Artist's Library: A Field Guide (Coffee House Press). She is co-founder and editor of The Library as Incubator Project. She lives in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Visit her online at erinn-batykefer.squarespace.com and at eb-writes.tumbler.com.

Congratulations to this year’s winners!


Read the review at NewPages.com

Our Spring 2016 issue is reviewed in NewPages.com

July 19, 2016 /

NewPages reviewed our Spring 2016 issue! Check it out!

Katy Hass’ review begins “The Spring 2016 issue of Zone 3 opens without preface or fanfare, allowing the writing to speak for itself,” and goes on to substantiate its claim that Zone 3’s writing is so strong it stands on its own.


Zone 3 Press Nonfiction Editor Amy Wright

Creative writing professor Dr. Amy Wright to publish four books in 2016

July 14, 2016 /

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn.– Austin Peay State University Associate Professor of Creative Writing Dr. Amy Wright is preparing for a busy 2016, as the poet, author and teacher will publish four collections of her writing, including her fifth chapbook, “Wherever The Land Is.”

A series of nonfiction essays comprised of the author’s research into work, loss, Emily Dickinson, and entomophagy, or the human consumption of insects, “Wherever The Land Is” explores a possible answer to humanity’s growing need for food sources.

“I’d been doing a lot of research into human consumption of insects, because food sustainability is going to only become more of a problem for society,” Wright said. “As we move toward 2050, the human population is expected to be somewhere around nine or 10 billion people.”

Wright’s research into the study of insects also spawned a side project, as she intends to publish a second full-length poetry collection, titled “Everything in the Universe.” Set for release with Iris Press this spring, Wright said the poetry collection was sparked by her fascination with the insects she researched for her prose chapbook.

“As I was doing research, I grew interested in bugs and I began writing poetry about the biodiversity and different forms of communication I came across in my research,” Wright said.

Drawing inspiration from personal, as well as gathered tales of “local yodelers, spit turners and other holy mackerels,” Wright’s second poetry collection, “Cracker Sonnets,” to be published by Brick Road Poetry Press, is a tribute to the cultural identity of the American South.

“I was born in Southwest Virginia, and I began thinking about all the joys and concerns and preoccupations that not just I have, but humanity has in general,” Wright said. “And, where I’m from, many of those preoccupations are cultural. So as I began to embrace some of these aspects of my identity, I found that I had a lot of material with which I could work.”

A fourth, collaborative poetry collection is also in the works, titled “Creeks of the Upper South.” The collection represents a joint effort between Wright and William Wright, senior editor of the Southern Poetry Anthology.

Sharing a similar cultural and geographical upbringing, Amy Wright and William Wright set about researching the many regional waterways and aquacultures in need of protection throughout the American Upper South.

“I’m from Southwestern Virginia, and (William Wright) lives in Georgia now, so we both have an affiliation with and respect for the Appalachian region,” Wright said. “(William) came up with the idea to collaborate on ‘Creeks of the Upper South,’ and it’s been really nice having a project like this that I could pursue on the side.”

Amy Wright is the Nonfiction Editor of Zone 3 Press, the literary press of Austin Peay State University. Her writing appears in a number of journals including Kenyon Review, Southern Poetry Anthology (Volumes III and VI) and Tupelo Quarterly.

She was awarded a Peter Taylor Fellowship for the Kenyon Review Writers’ Workshop, an Individual Artist’s Fellowship from the Tennessee Arts Commission, and a fellowship to the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts (VCCA).

For more information on Dr. Amy Wright, visit www.awrightawright.com. For information on APSU’s Department of Languages and Literature, visit www.apsu.edu/langlit.


Iconoclast Literary Magazine's Logo

Iconoclast Reviews Z3’s Fall 2015 Issue

September 3, 2016 /

Iconoclast reviews Z3’s Fall 2015 issue, calling it “the right mix of the literary and the accessible, the intimate and the grand.”


Ashley Seitz Kramer

Zone 3 Press to publish Ashley Seitz Kramer collection

August 31, 2016 /

Clarksville, TN – Zone 3 Press is proud to announce Museum of Distance, the first collection of works from poet Ashley Seitz Kramer.

The winner of the 2014 Zone 3 Press First Book Award, Kramer's work is wide in scope. Linking images and observations, Museum of Distance, offers a new view on daily reality.

In her review, award-winning poet Leslie Ullman describes Kramer's work as "exquisitely textured" and “impossible to resist.”

"Kramer's poems have extraordinary authority," Ullman said. "Every passage exquisitely textured, every provocation earned and convincing. It is impossible … to resist or question a single one of their flights."

An award-winning poet, Kramer earned the Ruth Stone Prize and Utah Writers' Contest. Major journals including Colorado Review, Dogwood and Quarterly West have also published her work.  A Pushcart Prize nominee, Kramer's work has appeared on Verse Daily, among other outlets.

Now residing in Utah, Kramer is assistant dean of Arts and Sciences at Westminster College.

Museum of Distance, will be available on Amazon, spdbooks.org and through Zone 3 Press.

APSU founded Zone 3 Press in 2006. The press's mission is to promote emerging writers and interest in poetry and prose.